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KOOZA

KOOZA tells the story of The Innocent, a melancholy loner in search of his place in the world.

KOOZA is a return to the origins of Cirque du Soleil: It combines two circus traditions - acrobatic performance and the art of clowning. The show highlights the physical demands of human performance in all its splendor and fragility, presented in a colorful mélange that emphasizes bold slapstick humor.

The Innocent's journey brings him into contact with a panoply of comic characters such as the King, the Trickster, the Pickpocket, and the Obnoxious Tourist and his Bad Dog.

Between strength and fragility, laughter and smiles, turmoil and harmony, KOOZA explores themes of fear, identity, recognition and power. The show is set in an electrifying and exotic visual world full of surprises, thrills, chills, audacity and total involvement.

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Touring in Germany, United Kingdom, Switzerland

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KOOZA - Creators

  • Guy Laliberté

    Founder and Creative Guide

    Guy Laliberté was born in Québec City in 1959. An accordionist, stilt-walker and fire-eater, he founded Quebec's first internationally-renowned circus with the support of a small group of accomplices. A bold visionary, Guy Laliberté recognized and cultivated the talents of the street performers from the Fête foraine de Baie-Saint-Paul and created Cirque du Soleil in 1984.

    Guy Laliberté was the first to orchestrate the marriage of cultures and artistic and acrobatic disciplines that is the hallmark of Cirque du Soleil. Since 1984, he has guided the creative team through the creation of every show and contributed to elevating the circus arts to the level of the great artistic disciplines.

    Cirque du Soleil has become an international organization, as much in terms of its makeup as in the scope of its activities and influence. Guy Laliberté now heads an organization with activities on five continents.

    In October 2007, Guy Laliberté entered into a second lifetime commitment by creating the ONE DROP Foundation to fight poverty around the world by providing sustainable access to safe water.  This new dream stems from the knowledge that the right to water is key to the survival of individuals and communities all over the world and from the values which have been at the heart of Cirque du Soleil since its inception:  the belief that life gives back what you have given and even the smallest gesture will make a difference.

    In September 2009, Guy Laliberté became the first Canadian private space explorer.  His mission was dedicated to raising awareness on water issues facing humankind on planet earth. Under the theme Moving Stars and Earth for Water, this first Poetic Social Mission in space aimed at touching people through an artistic approach: a special 120-minute webcast program featuring various artistic performances unfolding in 14 cities on five continents, including the International Space Station.

    Main Awards and Distinctions
    In 2012, Guy Laliberté was inducted into the American Gaming Association’s Gaming Hall of Fame. In 2011, he became one of the inductees of the Canadian Business Hall of Fame. Guy Laliberté was awarded his very own star on the legendary Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2010. In the same year, the Quebec government honoured Guy by promoting him from Chevalier (a distinction granted six years earlier) to Officier as a member of the Ordre de la Pléiade. Université Laval (Québec) awarded an honorary doctorate to Guy Laliberté in 2008. The year before, Guy Laliberté took the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award for all three levels: Quebec, Canada and international. In 2004, he received the Order of Canada, the highest distinction in the country, from the Governor General of Canada.  The same year, he was recognized by Time Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. In 2003, he was honoured by the Condé Nast group as part of the Never Follow Program, a tribute to creators and innovators. In 2001, he was named a Great Montrealer by the Académie des Grands Montréalais. In 1997, Guy Laliberté received the Ordre National du Québec, the highest distinction awarded by the Government of Quebec.

    Other awards and distinctions

    2009
    Lifetime Achievement Award granted by the Canadian Marketing Association

    2002
    Induction to Canada’s Walk of Fame

    1998
    Visionary Award granted by the American Craft Museum (now the Museum of Arts and Design in New York)

    1996
    Vision nouvelle award received at the 43rd Gala du Commerce (Quebec)

    1988
    Personality of the Year, Gala Excellence La Presse (Quebec)

    1988
    Entrepreneur of the Year, Les Affaires magazine (Quebec)

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  • David Shiner

    Writer and Director

    David Shiner loves to make people laugh but he takes the art of clowning seriously. “In essence the clown is a character who helps us keep in touch with the sacred part of ourselves,” he explains. “It’s a difficult part to play. At the core of the character is longing and the wish to find meaning in life.”

    David Shiner, who is best known as a clown, started out as a street mime in Paris and his career really took off in 1984, when was discovered at the renowned circus festival Cirque de Demain. He went on to perform with a succession of well-known companies including the German troupe Circus Roncalli and the Swiss National company Circus Knie. Between circus engagements he toured with Cirque du Soleil veteran René Bazinet performing the two-man show they created.

    David’s first formal association with Cirque du Soleil came in 1990, when he co-created and performed in Nouvelle Expérience, touring for 19 months throughout Canada and the USA. Thanks to such antics as stepping through, on and over much of the audience and his classic improv-based staging of a mock silent-movie melodrama with four members of the audience, he is probably the best-remembered of Cirque's clowns. The production was filmed for HBO in 1991 and his other television performances include numerous appearances on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson and Jay Leno. His most recent Cirque engagement was as the Writer and Director of KOOZA in 2007.

    David made his feature film debut in 1992, playing the part of a clown in Lorenzo's Oil, and the following year he played straight man to Bill Irwin in Sam Shepard's Silent Tongue. He and Irwin then created the two-man wordless show Fool Moon, featuring music by the Red Clay Ramblers. This evening of ‘inspired lunacy’ ran from 1992 to 1999, including three separate runs on Broadway. Fool Moon won a special Tony Award for Live Theatrical Presentation in 1999, a Drama Desk Award for Unique Theatrical Experience, and an Outer Critics Circle Special Achievement Award.

    In 2000 David originated the role of the Cat in the Hat, the host and guide of the Broadway stage musical Seussical. With the support of a grant from the Pugh Foundation he went on to develop a show at Seattle’s ACT Theatre and later adapted part of that show for his one-man production David Shiner in the Round.

    “Banana Shpeel is pure, fun slapstick,” says David Shiner. “There are certainly elements in Banana Shpeel that are recognizable from vaudeville, especially in the eccentric dance, singing and great clowning. But while the content may draw upon the traditional form, the approach we’re taking is very modern.”

    David was born in 1953 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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  • Serge Roy

    Creation Director

    Serge Roy has been part of the Cirque du Soleil family since before the organization officially came into being in 1984.

    Born into a musical family, Serge inherited a natural gift for music and show business. At age six, he went on stage to play drums with his saxophonist father. He touched on singing but chose to explore other avenues.

    Serge studied theatre and played drums in a band, but when he found himself in the town of Baie-Saint-Paul, Quebec he finally felt he had found a place where he belonged. At the local youth hostel, he met and befriended Gilles Ste-Croix and Guy Laliberté who were busy dreaming up with events and happenings that would lead a few years later to the creation of Cirque du Soleil.

    He was the Stage Manager for the 1984 and 1985 show Le Cirque du Soleil and went on to work as North American Tour Manager for both Nouvelle Expérience and Saltimbanco. He then took up duties as the Artistic Coordinator of Dralion, Quidam, Mystère and Saltimbanco. In 2005, he was appointed Creation Director of KOOZA, directed by David Shiner, a partnership he is repeating with Banana Shpeel.

    The position of Creation Director combines Serge Roy’s strengths and experience in inspiring others while satisfying his own creative drive. “The key to success as a Creation Director is bringing people together,” he says. “The Creation Director is the bridge between the dream of a guest director and the know-how that Cirque has accumulated over the years – and they each nourish the other. One of the essential ingredients for me is to have fun while establishing an atmosphere in which all the creators can flourish freely as individuals and work together as a close-knit team."

    For Serge Roy, Banana Shpeel is a collage of disparate and astounding styles and disciplines. “With this show, we want to throw the public off balance a bit,” he says. “What is this fusion of vaudeville, clowning arts, tap, eccentric dance, hip hop, physical comedy and crazy magic? It’s not circus, or a musical or a variety show, or even vaudeville. It is Banana Shpeel!”

    Serge Roy was born in Montréal, in 1957.

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  • Stéphane Roy

    Set Designer

    Stéphane Roy has worked as both a set designer and artistic director on over 100 productions in Montreal and abroad among which L’Odyssée, directed by Quebec playwright Dominic Champagne, at the Théâtre du Nouveau Monde (2002), and Les Âmes mortes, directed by Gilles Maheu, at Carbone 14 in Montreal (1996). Since 1990 he has designed sets for dance productions by such internationally-acclaimed dance troupes as La La La Human Steps and O Vertigo.While primarily active in theatre and dance, he has also worked in film, television, advertising and variety shows. Since 2011, Stéphane has been one of three artists in residence appointed by the Montreal Nature Museums group to create organic links between the city’s four natural science museums. He also designed The Warrior Emperor and China’s Terra Cotta Army exhibition at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in 2011. His achievements have earned him many awards and honors, including being named Revelation of the Year, All Categories Combined, by the Association Québécoise des Critiques de Théâtre in 1989. In 1992, the same association honored him with the award for best set design. His talent has also been recognized by the Conseil des Arts de la Communauté Urbaine de Montréal, the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television and the Académie Québécoise du Théâtre. For Cirque du Soleil, Stéphane designed the set for Dralion, Varekai, Zumanity, KOOZA, Zarkana and KURIOS – Cabinet of curiosities.

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  • Marie-Chantale Vaillancourt

    Costume Designer

    For the past 20 years Marie-Chantale Vaillancourt has designed costumes for a large number of theatre, dance, opera and film productions. Her work, which combines the two diciplines she has specialized in – set design as well as costume design – has been seen around the world.

    Since 1989 she has worked particularly closely with world-renowned writer, actor and director Robert Lepage, creating the costumes for many of his productions, including Les Sept Branches de la Rivière Ota, La Géométrie des Miracles, La Face Cachée de la Lune, Peter Gabriel's Growing Up tour, La Trilogie des Dragons and KÀ, for Cirque du Soleil.

    Through the years Marie-Chantale has won many major Canadian awards for her work, including two Masques de la Conception des Costumes, in 1995 and 2005. She has also received many award nominations – notably from the Genies and the Jutras for her work with Robert Lepage on the feature film Nô.

    "Even if KOOZA isn't specifically a clown show, a number of the characters are played by clowns," notes Marie-Chantale. "I needed to avoid clichés and caricature so I concentrated more on archetypes of universal and unchanging characters. There is a comic-book aesthetic to the designs, but it's filtered through the naïve point of view of the main character, The Innocent.

    My costumes draw on a wide variety of sources of inspiration: everything from graphic novels, the paintings of Gustav Klimt, Baron Münchhausen, the Mad Max movies, time-travel movies to India and Eastern Europe. This visually naïve, exotic and timeless universe evokes the world of toys, lead soldiers and children's books, with a wink toward Alice in Wonderland and the Wizard of Oz."

    Marie-Chantale Vaillancourt was born in Sept-Iles, Quebec in 1967.

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  • Jean-François Côté

    Composer

    A self-taught keyboard player, composer and prolific electronic musician since the 80s, Jean-François Côté is very active on the LA music scene. He has also worked with many of Quebec's leading singers and trailblazing groups. He is known for mixing existing styles seamlessly with electronic music to invent new forms.

    Jean-François was a promising hockey player as an adolescent, but he discovered his true calling at the age of 16 when he started playing keyboards with rock and soul groups on the Montreal music scene, developing sounds and a style that were uniquely his own. At the same age he got a job as a security guard for the very first Cirque du Soleil show. "At night," he recalls, "I would sneak behind René Dupéré's keyboard to make music and polish my technique."

    Years later Jean-François was playing keyboards for singer Julie Masse and was noticed by Cirque du Soleil composer Benoit Jutras. That encounter led to his first formal association with the company as Musical Director and Conductor for the Cirque shows "O" and Mystère. He also created the sound design for the Taiko drum sequence in the Cirque Imax film Journey of Man.

    Jean-François says Cirque is one of the most stimulating environments in which to work as a composer. "In spite of its size, Cirque has remained true to its primary vocation: the creation of quality shows. The liberty they give to the creators is unequaled."

    To express the human and funny aspects of KOOZA Jean-François Côté says he was inspired by Western pop music, from 70s funk to orchestral music, adding, "I also drew upon traditional Indian music and film scores from the 40s and 50s, a period I'm particularly fond of."

    Jean-François Côté was born in 1968 in Montreal.

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  • Clarence Ford

    Choreographer

    Clarence Ford is a prolific dancer, choreographer, teacher and film director from Toronto whose creations have been seen and enjoyed throughout Canada, the US and the rest of the world. He loves to collaborate with other artists and has worked alongside the legendary James Brown and stylized music videos for Robbie Williams and Barenaked Ladies to mention just a few.

    When he was five Clarence dreamed of becoming a pro hockey player. In High School he competed in track and field, breaking the Canadian Interscholastic record for the 100 meters, which attracted many athletic scholarships from the US. At the age of 17 he discovered dance and his career took off when he became a member of Soul Express, a troupe that undertook several cross-Canada tours, appeared on award shows and TV shows including their own special on CBC Television.

    From a stylistic point of view Clarence Ford is an innovator. He was one of the first choreographers in North America to incorporate street and hip hop choreography in Olympic figure skating and synchronized swimming. His work was so sensational that two Olympic skaters won gold medals with his choreography.

    Clarence has choreographed several figure skating specials such as Stars on Ice, and prize-winning routines for international skating stars including Kurt Browning, Scott Hamilton, Victor Kraatz and Shae-Lynn Bourne. He has also worked on Canadian award shows such as the Junos, the Genies and the Geminis.

    His work in film has taken him to Los Angeles, the West Indies and all over Europe, and includes choreography for such major studios as DreamWorks, Universal and Miramax. The feature films he has worked on include The Ladies Man, starring Will Ferrell, Tuxedo with Jackie Chan and Jennifer Love Hewitt, and Undercover Brother with Eddie Griffin and Billy Dee Williams. He has also choreographed around 40 television commercials, produced, directed and choreographed fashion shows and numerous special events such as the Reebok fashion show for Fashion Television. He has also produced, directed and choreographed concerts for Arrested Development, Soul Decision and Sugar Jones.

    Clarence Ford first worked with Cirque du Soleil in 1997, when Debra Brown invited him to take part in the studio workshops and contribute some of his choreographies for the Cirque show La Nouba. He followed that by joining the general training program at Cirque's International Headquarters in Montreal.

    Clarence says the choreography in KOOZA takes its inspiration from urban pop culture, vaudeville's "Eccentric Dance," jazz and street performance. "For me, it's about this fusion of choreography evolving into its own language," he says. "That provokes emotions, shows power and gives our audiences excitement!" 

    Clarence Ford was born in Toronto in 1956.

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  • Martin Labrecque

    Lighting Designer

    Martin Labrecque’s professional credits include more than 140 theatrical productions, as well as circus shows. Martin contributed to the critical success of several Quebec shows. He has won many Quebec awards for his lighting design in addition to several nominations. Martin Labrecque created the lighting for two critically acclaimed circus shows produced by Cirque Éloize, Rain and Nomade, as well as Cirque du Soleil shows Corteo, KOOZA, Viva ELVIS and Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour before KURIOS – Cabinet of curiosities. In 2009, Martin designed the lighting for an eleven-hour show by Canadian author, director and actor Wajdi Mouawad, which was presented in the courtyard of the Palais des Papes in Avignon, France. He also worked on the show Paradis Perdu, directed by Dominic Champagne and presented in Montreal and Belles Soeurs (2011) directed by René Richard Cyr.

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  • Jonathan Deans

    Sound Designer

    Jonathan Deans is one of the most sought-after live entertainment sound designers in the world. As a young man, he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company as an actor but had also a keen interest in sound and so began to blend with a theatrical context. Several years later, after a spell as a sound engineer in the music industry, notably at Morgan Studios where he brushed shoulders with artists such as Cat Stevens, Paul Simon and Rick Wakeman, he made his way back to the theatre via the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, and later went on to mix the sound for the musical A Chorus Line. One success soon followed another, and he became the sound mixing engineer for dozens of London’s West End productions. Jonathan’s success as a mixing sound engineer led to him being hired as sound designer on the musical Marilyn. This was followed by work on other productions as Designer on Time, Les Misérables, Mutiny, Jean Seberg to mention a few. Over a decade later he relocated in America where he has designed systems and productions for theme parks, stadiums, arenas and Broadway productions including Ragtime, Fosse, King David, Damn Yankees, Taboo, Brooklyn, Lestat, Pirate Queen, Young Frankenstein, La Cage Aux Folles, Spiderman, and Priscilla Queen of the Desert. With Michael Jackson ONE Jonathan is creating the sound system and the audio environment of his 14th Cirque du Soleil show since Saltimbanco in 1992.

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  • Leon Rothenberg

    Sound Designer

    Leon Rothenberg brings an extensive and varied background in music composition and computer programming to his work as a sound designer. In 1995 he studied North Indian Classical Music at the Sangit Mahabharati School in Mumbai, India while a student at Oberlin College, where he earned a Bachelor of Music degree as well as a B.A. in Computer Science. He earned his MFA in Sound Design from the California Institute of the Arts in 2002.

    “I like to think that my way of thinking about sound is very musical. Even as a kid I knew I wanted a career in music and I played many different instruments. But I had also done lots of sound experiments using a reel-to-reel machine, starting when I was about eight years old,” Leon recalls. “In college I started writing music for plays and I realized sound composition and sound design for theatre provided far more opportunities for collaboration, and that was exciting.”

    After completing graduate school Leon worked as a Production Engineer for college and community theatrical productions in Southern California. It wasn’t long before he found himself in demand for larger shows at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles, New York and further afield. In 2003 he co-designed the sound for a large multi-building site-specific production of King Lear that was presented in Los Angeles and in France. He has also worked on a number of experimental animation films and taught courses in Creative Listening and Sound Design.

    Leon Rothenberg’s first experience on a Cirque du Soleil show was as the assistant to sound designer Jonathan Deans on KÀ. Their association continued with Corteo, LOVE at the Mirage, and the travelling show Kooza – for which Leon received his first Cirque credit as a sound designer.

    Leon summarizes his approach to Wintuk by observing, “You want to reconcile the auditory experience with the visual experience so that no matter where you sit you get something compelling and interesting.”

    Leon Rothenberg was born in 1974 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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  • Rogé Francoeur

    Props Designer

    Rogé Francoeur dreamed of acting as a youngster, but it was behind the scenes rather than on stage that he was to make his mark. His studies in Fine Arts in Quebec and sculpture at York University in Toronto led him to a career creating props for film, theatre and television productions.

    Rogé started in film as a set decorator, model-maker and props designer. He worked on many features, including Emile Radok's Taming of the Demons (1985) which was instrumental in his choice of career. He also applied his three-dimensional point of view to Shadow of the Wolf (1992) directed by Jacques Dorfmann, the 1993 TV movie Zelda directed by Pat O'Connor, and Screamers (1995) directed by Christian Duguay.

    In 1996, Rogé Francoeur worked as a creative assistant, set decorator and model-maker for Cinema Avenue Japan, a major film exhibition in presented in Tokyo. For the past six years he has taught prop design and set painting at a college in Saint Hyacinthe, Quebec, and he is currently completing a Master's degree in teaching with a thesis on show creation.

    Rogé's first formal association with Cirque did not come until 1992 when he worked with the costume designer Dominique Lemieux on the creation of Saltimbanco. He went on to work with set designer Michel Crête, creating props for the shows Mystère and Alegría in 1993 and 1994. Since 2003 he has been a consultant on R&D projects for Cirque and has also worked closely with the costume department. He says it was his work on Alegría that really caught the attention of the company, which led to KOOZA – the first time he has worked on a Cirque show as a designer.

    "KOOZA is an exploration of the world of the clown, as imagined by David Shiner," he explains. "The performances of the comic actors are at a very high level and the props must never upstage their characters. My constant preoccupation is to keep things simple, ergonomic and compatible with the set design. My approach to prop design is impressionistic. Props are often only fully revealed when seen from a distance, or under lighting."

    Rogé Francoeur was born in 1963 in Macamic, Quebec.

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  • Danny Zen

    Acrobatic Equipment and Rigging Designer

    Danny Zen first arrived at Cirque du Soleil in 1990 to work as a welder in the company's workshops. That same year he went on the first European tour of Le Cirque Réinventé, then moved on to Nouvelle Expérience on which he worked as a welder, assembler, mechanic and head usher. In 1992 he toured with Saltimbanco as a tent technician. Danny has worked at the National Circus School in Montreal and has, over the years, contributed to the design of most of the aerial acrobatic equipment used in the Cirque du Soleil shows Alegría, Mystère, Quidam, Dralion, Varekai, "O", La Nouba and. He was also Head Rigger for Quidam in 1996. In 2008, he designed the rigging and equipment for the acrobatics show at the Quebec City 400th anniversary celebrations. KURIOS – Cabinet of curiosities is Danny Zen’s fourth engagement as Acrobatic Equipment and Rigging Designer for a Cirque du Soleil show, following Corteo, KOOZA and Zarkana.

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  • André Simard

    Acrobatic Performance Designer

    André Simard has been working with Cirque du Soleil since 1987. That year, he created a swinging trapeze act for the show Nouvelle Expérience, sparking a genuine revolution in high-flying aerial movement. Under his direction, the acrobatic feats performed by artists in motion somewhere between Earth and sky, either in a theatre or under a big top, achieved the fluidity of ballet. Between 1989 and 2000, 13 of the acts he created for Cirque du Soleil, the National Circus School and his own company of artists, Studio de création les gens d'R, garnered accolades in festivals attended by the finest circus artists from all over the world.

    The new circus arts are indebted to Simard for his creation of the discipline of aerial silk acrobatics in 1995. Another example of technological and choreographic innovation, stemming from his collaboration with acrobatic apparatus designer Jaque Paquin, was the Boat act in "O". As well, Simard has designed most of the aerial acts in the shows that Cirque performs around the world.

    For over 30 years, André Simard has succeeded in striking a harmonious balance between his three areas of expertise: the fine arts, elite sports, and the circus. In the early 1970s, he was a member of Canada's national gymnastics team while a student at the Institut des arts graphiques de Montréal. In addition, while preparing to compete in the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, he trained clowns and other public entertainers at the Centre Immaculée-Conception in Montréal, a forerunner of the National Circus School. In his own words, he is "constantly trying to meld the rules of biomechanics, as applied to athletic training, with the evocative power of the performing arts." This approach has also infused his teaching at the National Circus School, as well as at the Centre national des arts du cirque de Châlons-sur-Marne and the École nationale de Cirque de Rosny-sous-Bois, both in France.

    In 1995 he founded the Studio de création les gens d'R in Montréal, an artistic endeavor that affords him the opportunity to push the envelope of emotional expression through aerial movement. In 2001 this troupe gave the world premiere performance of Échos in Venice. The show was commissioned by the organizers of that city's celebrated Biennale arts festival.

    "For CRISS ANGEL Believe, I’ve come up with a way for the dervish characters to spin by hiding ropes inside their costumes," he says. "I've also introduced acrobatic elements into the stilt walkers’ dance numbers, and I’ve devised a motorized acrobatic mechanism for the character of Kayala: When she emerges from her flower to do her hoop routine, she grabs hold of the petals, which in reality are made out of transparent flexible PVC tubes built into her costume."

    André Simard was born in 1945 in Montreal.

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  • Florence Cornet

    Makeup Designer

    Florence Cornet has been exploring ways to connect with the public through her makeup designs for over twenty-five years. In addition to having worked on numerous theatre, dance, opera and musical productions, her impressive résumé also includes costume, artistic direction and puppetry work, as she has been involved with over 200 productions in the course of her career. Her work has been featured in productions at some of Quebec’s leading venues, including Théâtre Petit à Petit, Théâtre du Trident, Théâtre de la Licorne and Théâtre du Nouveau Monde. She teaches make-up techniques in theatre and circus schools and has spent several years working in film and television. She has worked with renowned Quebec directors such as Serge Denoncourt, Dominic Champagne, Claude Poissant, Wajdi Mouawad, Denise Guilbault, Michel Lemieux and Victor Pilon, as well as Robert Lepage. In 2000, she was nominated for a Gémeaux Award for best make-up for Bernar Hébert’s film Une âme immortelle. After Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour, Florence Cornet is designing the make-up for her second Cirque du Soleil show following KOOZA.

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