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Creators

 

Creators

  • Guy Laliberté

    Founder and Creative Guide

    Guy Laliberté was born in Québec City in 1959. An accordionist, stilt-walker and fire-eater, he founded Quebec's first internationally-renowned circus with the support of a small group of accomplices. A bold visionary, Guy Laliberté recognized and cultivated the talents of the street performers from the Fête foraine de Baie-Saint-Paul and created Cirque du Soleil in 1984.

    Guy Laliberté was the first to orchestrate the marriage of cultures and artistic and acrobatic disciplines that is the hallmark of Cirque du Soleil. Since 1984, he has guided the creative team through the creation of every show and contributed to elevating the circus arts to the level of the great artistic disciplines.

    Cirque du Soleil has become an international organization, as much in terms of its makeup as in the scope of its activities and influence. Guy Laliberté now heads an organization with activities on five continents.

    In October 2007, Guy Laliberté entered into a second lifetime commitment by creating the ONE DROP Foundation to fight poverty around the world by providing sustainable access to safe water.  This new dream stems from the knowledge that the right to water is key to the survival of individuals and communities all over the world and from the values which have been at the heart of Cirque du Soleil since its inception:  the belief that life gives back what you have given and even the smallest gesture will make a difference.

    In September 2009, Guy Laliberté became the first Canadian private space explorer.  His mission was dedicated to raising awareness on water issues facing humankind on planet earth. Under the theme Moving Stars and Earth for Water, this first Poetic Social Mission in space aimed at touching people through an artistic approach: a special 120-minute webcast program featuring various artistic performances unfolding in 14 cities on five continents, including the International Space Station.

    Main Awards and Distinctions
    In 2012, Guy Laliberté was inducted into the American Gaming Association’s Gaming Hall of Fame. In 2011, he became one of the inductees of the Canadian Business Hall of Fame. Guy Laliberté was awarded his very own star on the legendary Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2010. In the same year, the Quebec government honoured Guy by promoting him from Chevalier (a distinction granted six years earlier) to Officier as a member of the Ordre de la Pléiade. Université Laval (Québec) awarded an honorary doctorate to Guy Laliberté in 2008. The year before, Guy Laliberté took the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award for all three levels: Quebec, Canada and international. In 2004, he received the Order of Canada, the highest distinction in the country, from the Governor General of Canada.  The same year, he was recognized by Time Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. In 2003, he was honoured by the Condé Nast group as part of the Never Follow Program, a tribute to creators and innovators. In 2001, he was named a Great Montrealer by the Académie des Grands Montréalais. In 1997, Guy Laliberté received the Ordre National du Québec, the highest distinction awarded by the Government of Quebec.

    Other awards and distinctions

    2009
    Lifetime Achievement Award granted by the Canadian Marketing Association

    2002
    Induction to Canada’s Walk of Fame

    1998
    Visionary Award granted by the American Craft Museum (now the Museum of Arts and Design in New York)

    1996
    Vision nouvelle award received at the 43rd Gala du Commerce (Quebec)

    1988
    Personality of the Year, Gala Excellence La Presse (Quebec)

    1988
    Entrepreneur of the Year, Les Affaires magazine (Quebec)

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  • Robert Lepage

    Writer and Director

    The multidisciplinary artist Robert Lepage is equally talented as a theatre director, playwright, actor and film director. Lauded by critics the world over, his modern and unusual work transcends all boundaries between disciplines.

    In 1975, Lepage entered the Conservatoire d'art dramatique de Québec and, following a study period in France, he took part in several productions in which he combined the roles of actor, writer and director. In 1985, he created The Dragons' Trilogy, a show that earned him international recognition. He followed this with Vinci (1986), Polygraph (1987), Tectonic Plates (1988), Needles and Opium (1991). With A Midsummer Night’s Dream in 1992, he became the first North American to direct a Shakespeare play at the Royal National Theatre in London.

    From 1989 to 1993 Lepage was Artistic Director of the Théâtre français at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. In 1994 he founded his own company Ex Machina and directed The Seven Streams of the River Ota (1994), Le Songe d’une nuit d’été (1995) and a solo production, Elsinore (1995).

    Also in 1994, Robert Lepage made his début in the world of cinema. He wrote and directed his first feature film, Le Confessional, which was screened the following year at the Cannes Festival Directors’ Fortnight. He went on to direct Polygraph in 1996, Nô in 1997, Possible Worlds in 2000 (his first feature film written in English), and finally, in 2003, a film adaptation of his play The Far Side of the Moon.

    La Caserne, a multidisciplinary production centre in Quebec City, opened in 1997 under Robert Lepage’s leadership. There, he created and produced Geometry of Miracles (1998), Zulu Time (1999), The Far Side of The Moon (2000), a new version of The Dragons’ Trilogy with a new cast (2003) and The Busker’s Opera (2004). This was followed by The Andersen Project (2005), Lipsynch (2007), The Blue Dragon (2008) and Eonnagata (2009).

    Lepage made a grand entrance in the opera world when he staged the successful double bill of Bluebeard’s Castle and Erwartung (1993). He followed this with La Damnation de Faust presented for the first time in the Saito Kinen Festival Matsumoto, Japan (1999), 1984 in London (2005), The Rake’s Progress in Brussels (2007) and The Nightingale and Other Short Fables in Toronto (2009).

    Robert Lepage created and directed Peter Gabriel’s Secret World Tour (1993) and his Growing Up Tour (2002). As part of the festivities surrounding the 400th anniversary of Quebec City in 2008, he created Le Moulin à imagesTM – the largest architectural projection ever produced – on the walls of the Bunge, a massive grain silo. In 2009 he and his Ex Machina team created Aurora Borealis, a permanent light show for the structure, inspired by the colours of the northern lights.

    Winner of many prestigious awards, in 2009 Lepage received the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for his outstanding contribution to Canada’s cultural life throughout his career.

    TOTEM is Robert Lepage’s second Cirque du Soleil show following KÀ (2004). "Inspired by the foundation narratives of the first peoples, TOTEM explores the birth and evolution of the world, the relentless curiosity of human beings and their constant desire to excel,” he says. “The word totem suggests that human beings carry in their bodies the full potential of all living species, even the Thunderbird’s desire to fly to the top of the totem.”

    Robert Lepage was born in Quebec City in 1957.

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  • Guy Caron

    Director of Creation

    Caron was Cirque's first Artistic Director when the company was created in 1984. He is also the founder of Montreal 's National Circus School. After an absence of a few years to pursue other interests, he returned to Cirque in 1998 to direct Dralion (1999) and work as Director of Creation on KÀ (2004).

    Guy Caron is one of the main pioneers of the rebirth of the circus arts. In 1975, when no circus existed in Quebec, Guy Caron left for Hungary and studied for three years at the École de cirque de Budapest. In 1981, he founded the École nationale de cirque de Montréal with Pierre Leclerc. He was its executive director for ten years.

    He regularly seats on the juries of many circus festivals all over the world. From 1987 to 1989, he was the executive director of the Centre national des arts du cirque de Châlons-en-Champagne, in France. Since 1992, he has been a consultant and director for well-known circuses in Switzerland, France and the United States. In 1996, he directed three acts that won the Clown d'Or award at the Festival de Monte Carlo. These acts were performed by members of the Swiss family Knie.

    Guy Caron came to the circus arts through a fortuitous encounter with clowns Rodrigue Tremblay and Sonia Côté, alias Chatouille and Chocolat, in the 1970s. With them, he went to Hungary, and once back in Montreal, he was at the forefront of the public entertainers who were precursors to Cirque du Soleil. He owes his vocation as an actor to his mentor, man of theatre Paul Buissonneau. "He gave me everything: my tools as an actor, my first professional job, and even, quite often, his theatre, the Quat'Sous," he says.

    Circus arts are far from being the only field where Guy Caron has left his mark. He has four times been a member of the creative team for Quebec singer Diane Dufresne's shows. He has also worked on scenarios and as an artistic director or director for many forms of variety shows, especially cabarets, musicals, singing and magic.

    Guy Caron has also taken university courses in performance arts administration. This education has served, among other things, to help him sit for four years on the board of directors of the École nationale de cirque de Montréal and for three years on the board of the Festival mondial du cirque de demain, in Paris.

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  • Mark Fisher

    Theatre and Set Designer

    British architect Mark Fisher’s interest in building temporary structures and inflatables caught the attention of Roger Waters and led to his first rock ’n’ roll commission for Pink Floyd’s Animals tour in 1977. Mark has since earned an international reputation for his spectacular concert designs. His best-known work includes The Wall and Division Bell for Pink Floyd, Steel Wheels, Bridges to Babylon and Bigger Bang for the Rolling Stones, as well as Popmart for U2. Most recently Mark was Chief Designer for the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics and U2’s 2009-2010 360° tour.  Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour will be Mark Fisher’s third collaboration with Cirque du Soleil following KÀ and Viva ELVIS.

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  • Marie-Chantale Vaillancourt

    Costume Designer

    For the past 20 years Marie-Chantale Vaillancourt has designed costumes for a large number of theatre, dance, opera and film productions. Her work, which combines the two diciplines she has specialized in – set design as well as costume design – has been seen around the world.

    Since 1989 she has worked particularly closely with world-renowned writer, actor and director Robert Lepage, creating the costumes for many of his productions, including Les Sept Branches de la Rivière Ota, La Géométrie des Miracles, La Face Cachée de la Lune, Peter Gabriel's Growing Up tour, La Trilogie des Dragons and KÀ, for Cirque du Soleil.

    Through the years Marie-Chantale has won many major Canadian awards for her work, including two Masques de la Conception des Costumes, in 1995 and 2005. She has also received many award nominations – notably from the Genies and the Jutras for her work with Robert Lepage on the feature film Nô.

    "Even if KOOZA isn't specifically a clown show, a number of the characters are played by clowns," notes Marie-Chantale. "I needed to avoid clichés and caricature so I concentrated more on archetypes of universal and unchanging characters. There is a comic-book aesthetic to the designs, but it's filtered through the naïve point of view of the main character, The Innocent.

    My costumes draw on a wide variety of sources of inspiration: everything from graphic novels, the paintings of Gustav Klimt, Baron Münchhausen, the Mad Max movies, time-travel movies to India and Eastern Europe. This visually naïve, exotic and timeless universe evokes the world of toys, lead soldiers and children's books, with a wink toward Alice in Wonderland and the Wizard of Oz."

    Marie-Chantale Vaillancourt was born in Sept-Iles, Quebec in 1967.

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  • René Dupéré

    Composer and Arranger

    René Dupéré played a key role in shaping the artistic universe of Cirque du Soleil during its first ten years. His music for the shows Nouvelle Expérience, We Reinvent the Circus, Saltimbanco, Mystère and Alegría reverberated – and continue to reverberate – well beyond the big top.

    In 1994-95, the albums Alegría and Mystère spent several weeks at the top of the Billboard charts in the world music category. In 1995 and again in 2004 the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal paid homage to the music of René Dupéré and Cirque du Soleil.

    A master of hybrid musical styles, René composed some of the music for the ceremonies commemorating the return of Hong Kong to China in 1997. The following year he created the music for the world tour of Holiday on Ice, the Amsterdam-based ice ballet troupe. He has also written music for several television series and films.

    René Dupéré’s talents have earned him a number of awards and distinctions. He is a two-time recipient of the Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN) Hagood Hardy award. He is also known for “Ismya Vova,” composed for an Air Canada ad campaign, which won a Golden Award in 1998 at the New York Publicity festival for Best Original Music. Laval University awarded him an honorary doctorate for his contribution to popular music in Quebec.

    In 1998, René formed his own record company, Netza, and released his third album with the label in October 2002. In 2004 he returned to Cirque du Soleil for the first time since the creation of Alegría in 1994, to compose the music and create arrangements for the show KÀ.

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  • Jacques Heim

    Choroegrapher

    When choreographer Jacques Heim first heard that Cirque du Soleil was interested in working with him he thought it was a mistake. Although he had admired every Cirque show he had seen, and he had seen almost all of them, he never thought Cirque and his own dance company would be a good fit—until KÀ came along.

    Heim was born in Paris but moved to New York as a young man, and studied as a theatre major at Middlebury College , Vermont . Upon graduation he moved to England, where he studied dance, then came back to the United States where he founded the acclaimed Los Angeles dance company Diavolo.

    For Heim, the link between Diavolo and KÀ lay in the process. "It's the same," he says, pointing out that, just like the cast of KÀ, Diavolo's dancers work with enormous architectural structures and props in constant motion. "I work with acrobats and different types of movers and dancers. We don't do circus but we do deal very much with structures and architectural environments. I'm not used to Cirque, but I am used to this kind of process."

    To create the show's choreography Heim had to blend dance with martial arts, acrobatics, puppets and projections—and he says that took some getting used to. "All those different languages and layers had to be mixed and put together. It wasn't easy, but I knew it was going to be possible because we had Robert Lepage as our director, and with his vision, somehow we would be able to put it together."

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  • Luc Lafortune

    Lighting Designer

    In directing the lighting for the show KÀ, Luc Lafortune is contributing to his twelfth creation with Cirque du Soleil. He has been associated with Cirque du Soleil since its beginnings in 1984. That year, he was hired as a lighting technician backstage. The following year, he was at the lighting control booth for the young troupe's eight-month tour. In 1986, he became the lighting designer. Since then, his lighting creations have toured the world.

    At Cirque du Soleil, his creator's resumé includes the shows We Reinvent the Circus, Fascination, Nouvelle Expérience, Saltimbanco, Mystère, Alegría, Quidam, "O", La Nouba, Dralion, Varekai and Zumanity. He was also co-director of photography for the video recording of the show Quidam.

    In 2002, he worked with director Robert Lepage to design the lighting for British singer Peter Gabriel's world tour, Growing Up. Many other internationally successful artists and groups have called upon his talents. Since 1996, he has worked with, among others, No Doubt, The Eagles, Gipsy Kings and Swiss circus Salto Natale.

    Luc Lafortune studied theatre production at Concordia University in Montreal . He was originally interested in set design. "One day, during rehearsal, I discovered the ability of light to redefine a space, to make a strong contribution to the image and spirit of a show," he says. The experience inspired a passion that still permeates his work today.

    The excellence of his work has garnered him many awards. In 1992, his lighting design for the show Saltimbanco earned him a Drama-Logue Theater Award, given by critics from the California-based theatre magazine of that name. In 1994, he was chosen as designer of the year by the magazine Lighting Dimensions International (LDI). In 1997, the Martin Professionals show The Atomic Lounge, for which Luc Lafortune was artistic director, won the LDI for best light show. In 1998, he took an Entertainment Design Award for his lighting design for the show "O".

    Luc Lafortune is regularly invited as a speaker to share his knowledge and thoughts with students and professionals all over the world.

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  • Jonathan Deans

    Sound Designer

    Jonathan Deans is one of the most sought-after live entertainment sound designers in the world. As a young man, he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company as an actor but had also a keen interest in sound and so began to blend with a theatrical context. Several years later, after a spell as a sound engineer in the music industry, notably at Morgan Studios where he brushed shoulders with artists such as Cat Stevens, Paul Simon and Rick Wakeman, he made his way back to the theatre via the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, and later went on to mix the sound for the musical A Chorus Line. One success soon followed another, and he became the sound mixing engineer for dozens of London’s West End productions. Jonathan’s success as a mixing sound engineer led to him being hired as sound designer on the musical Marilyn. This was followed by work on other productions as Designer on Time, Les Misérables, Mutiny, Jean Seberg to mention a few. Over a decade later he relocated in America where he has designed systems and productions for theme parks, stadiums, arenas and Broadway productions including Ragtime, Fosse, King David, Damn Yankees, Taboo, Brooklyn, Lestat, Pirate Queen, Young Frankenstein, La Cage Aux Folles, Spiderman, and Priscilla Queen of the Desert. With Michael Jackson ONE Jonathan is creating the sound system and the audio environment of his 14th Cirque du Soleil show since Saltimbanco in 1992.

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  • Holger Förterer

    Interactive Projection Designer

    To call one of Holger Förterer creations a “projection” doesn’t come close to describing the magic he conjures with light.

    In Förterer’s world, KÀ dancers and acrobats do not simply perform on a stage that’s illuminated by a light show, they actually direct what happens to the projection through their movements—the scenery reacts to everything they do. The result is a smooth succession of hypnotic, realistic illusions that play out in real time as the performers interact with the unseen technology that makes it all happen.

    So how does it all happen? First, the performers are captured by an infrared-sensitive camera above the stage and their movements are tracked by a computer with software written by Förterer and three programmers. The second component is a system that in effect turns the stage into an oversized touch-screen that can determine the precise position of each actor, dancer and acrobat.

    Without the performers to provide this input, nothing would happen. The information gathered from them influences the mathematical parameters of any number of worlds that are then reprojected onto the stage they occupy. “In essence, what we have is an intelligent set,” says Förterer. “And everything the audience sees is created by the computer.”

    But as advanced as all this technology is, Holger Förterer does not see himself exclusively or primarily as a technician. “I am midway between art and technology,” he says. “All of my efforts seek to use technology to the point where it becomes art. At the same time, I struggle against technology taking me to the point where it takes over, at the expense of art. Ideas are the most important thing in our work. Man understands ideas, machines don't. However, if art cannot bring machines to feel emotions, who or what can? I am going to try.”

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  • Michael Curry

    Puppet Designer

    Puppet Designer Michael Curry works widely in both conceptual and technical development with the foremost entertainment companies such as the Metropolitan Opera, London's Royal National Theatre, Disney Theatrical Productions, LA Opera, and Universal Pictures. Michael has been the recipient of many prestigious awards from his peers, including several awards for his puppet and costume work on Broadway, Olympic ceremonies as well as his continuing innovations in the fields of visual effects and puppetry design. He has collaborated with Julie Taymor on many stage and opera productions. Among his numerous awards, he received the 1998 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Puppet Design in recognition of his work for Taymor on The Lion King. Michael’s other credits include an opera directed by Robert Lepage at the Paris Opera, an opera at La Scala, Milan, directed by William Friedkin, and the Broadway production of Spider Man with music by Bono and Edge, directed by Julie Taymor. After KÀ, The Beatles LOVE, Wintuk and CRISS ANGEL Believe, Michael Curry collaborates with Cirque du Soleil for the fifth time with Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL World Tour.

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  • Patricia Ruel

    Props Designer

    Patricia Ruel has contributed to the success of a myriad of plays, television shows and special events, both in Quebec and abroad. Her track record includes over 50 productions as Props Designer and a dozen as Set Designer. Patricia has received two Théâtre Denise-Pelletier awards for her sets for Révizor, directed by Reynald Robinson, in 2003, and Edmond Dantès, directed by Robert Bellefeuille, in 2004. In 2011, she received a Gémeau award in the “Best Set Design: all variety categories, magazines, public affairs, sports” category for the end-of-year special Bye Bye 2010, aired on SRC. She has worked with various theatre directors, including Robert Lepage, Dominic Champagne and Fernand Rainville. She has also worked on several projects for Cirque du Soleil, including KÀ, The Beatles LOVE and Viva ELVIS as Props Designer and Wintuk and Banana Shpeel as Set Designer.

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  • Jaque Paquin

    Acrobatic Equipment and Rigging Designer

    There’s no formal training for a profession like Jaque Paquin’s. “To do it, you have to do it,” he says. Jaque studied art history (specializing in film) and electronics in school, and began his career in the arts working as a lighting technician at the age of 14. The following year, he opened a disco.

    He went on to work as a stage technician in theatre, a set painter in film, a grip in television and, finally, as a carpenter, team leader and project head in a set construction workshop for theatre and variety shows. "I've worked in nearly all of the trades plied by the people who build and operate my equipment," he says. “So I make an effort to facilitate the work of the technicians and the artists.”

    Jaque joined Cirque du Soleil in 1990 as head of the construction workshop, where he created aerial environments for such shows as Saltimbanco, Dralion, Varekai, Zumanity, KÀ and “O”. From 1991 to 1996, he was Technical Director for the North American tour of Saltimbanco, and he was the show’s Technical Director when it toured Europe and Japan. In 1995 and 1996, he was director of all installations for the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal and the FrancoFolies de Montréal.

    His imagination, artistic flair, and technical skill conjured up the fantastic boat in "O" – a piece of acrobatic equipment that brings together three techniques never before combined in the history of circus arts: the parallel bars, the Korean cradle and the flying trapeze.

    Whether working on the rigging for a show or as head of research and development for Cirque du Soleil's acrobatic equipment, Jaque is constantly on the lookout for ways to give a new look to a wide variety of circus arts. However, he says, “There’s never any compromise for safety. If an artistic vision can be achieved only by lowering the safety standards, then that element of the show will be dropped.”

    For CRISS ANGEL Believe™, Jaque Paquin has designed the equipment used in the illusions as well as the rigging for all of the scenic equipment (sound, lighting and set decorations). "We’ve developed unprecedented techniques, especially for the magic numbers," he says. “I like to say that this show contains some of my best inventions that I will never be able to talk about."

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  • André Simard

    Aerial Acrobatics Designer and Head Coach– Creation

    André Simard has been working with Cirque du Soleil since 1987. That year, he created a swinging trapeze act for the show Nouvelle Expérience, sparking a genuine revolution in high-flying aerial movement. Under his direction, the acrobatic feats performed by artists in motion somewhere between Earth and sky, either in a theatre or under a big top, achieved the fluidity of ballet. Between 1989 and 2000, 13 of the acts he created for Cirque du Soleil, the National Circus School and his own company of artists, Studio de création les gens d'R, garnered accolades in festivals attended by the finest circus artists from all over the world.

    The new circus arts are indebted to Simard for his creation of the discipline of aerial silk acrobatics in 1995. Another example of technological and choreographic innovation, stemming from his collaboration with acrobatic apparatus designer Jaque Paquin, was the Boat act in "O". As well, Simard has designed most of the aerial acts in the shows that Cirque performs around the world.

    For over 30 years, André Simard has succeeded in striking a harmonious balance between his three areas of expertise: the fine arts, elite sports, and the circus. In the early 1970s, he was a member of Canada's national gymnastics team while a student at the Institut des arts graphiques de Montréal. In addition, while preparing to compete in the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, he trained clowns and other public entertainers at the Centre Immaculée-Conception in Montréal, a forerunner of the National Circus School. In his own words, he is "constantly trying to meld the rules of biomechanics, as applied to athletic training, with the evocative power of the performing arts." This approach has also infused his teaching at the National Circus School, as well as at the Centre national des arts du cirque de Châlons-sur-Marne and the École nationale de Cirque de Rosny-sous-Bois, both in France.

    In 1995 he founded the Studio de création les gens d'R in Montréal, an artistic endeavor that affords him the opportunity to push the envelope of emotional expression through aerial movement. In 2001 this troupe gave the world premiere performance of Échos in Venice. The show was commissioned by the organizers of that city's celebrated Biennale arts festival.

    "For CRISS ANGEL Believe, I’ve come up with a way for the dervish characters to spin by hiding ropes inside their costumes," he says. "I've also introduced acrobatic elements into the stilt walkers’ dance numbers, and I’ve devised a motorized acrobatic mechanism for the character of Kayala: When she emerges from her flower to do her hoop routine, she grabs hold of the petals, which in reality are made out of transparent flexible PVC tubes built into her costume."

    André Simard was born in 1945 in Montreal.

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  • Nathalie Gagné

    Makeup Designer

    Nathalie Gagné was one of the first graduates of the Montreal branch of the famed Paris-based makeup school École Christian Chauveau. Before joining Cirque du Soleil, Nathalie worked in theatre, film and television. She has twice been nominated for a Gémeau award for best makeup, all categories combined. The honor is conferred by the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television. Since 1995 Nathalie has crafted more than 1,000 separate makeup designs for 16 Cirque du Soleil shows. In 2010, Nathalie designed the makeup for the play Il Campiello by Carlo Goldoni, directed by Serge Denoncourt, and for the 3D movie Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away produced by James Cameron and directed by Andrew Adamson in 2012.

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